Totally Distracted

This is a very busy, fantastically crowded time of the sports year. This past weekend boasted the beginning of the Major League Baseball playoffs, NFL games for week 4, NCAA college football games, race #3 of the chase for the Sprint Cup in NASCAR, and (for me) English Premier League soccer. It is the time of year that is so busy with exciting sports action that you feel like the TV remote is glued to your hand and your thumb gets sore from switching to so many different great events. It is fabulous. At the same time, however,  having so many things to watch, it was a hard weekend to focus on any one of them. I felt as if I was totally distracted trying to stay on top of all of the top-level games, matches and, of course, the race.

Being distracted is not limited to a busy sports weekend, however. It is actually a huge challenge for all of us who seek to live for Christ in a fast-paced world running at breakneck speed. We are confronted by so much information, so many options, and such seemingly endless stimuli, it’s easy to become distracted in the walk of faith. We can be pulled in so many different directions that we lose our way and find our relationship with Christ slowly fading into the background of our lives. In those moments of distraction, it is vital to reset our hearts on the things that matter most. Jesus said, “But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you” (Matthew 6:33).

His point? The “first” things are where our focus needs to be, and those first things revolve around kingdom values and devotion. Those first things, of course, cannot be achieved in our own abilities, which is why we find ourselves getting distracted in the first place. The only way we will be able to consistently, faithfully, and passionately seek the first things is if we rely on the wisdom and grace of God to keep our minds, hearts, and commitment where it needs to be. Only then can we keep our eyes on the Savior, instead of being totally distracted.

 

Bill Crowder, Sports Spectrum Chaplain